Growth and Flourishing of Jewry and the Expulsion

A new series with Trudy Gold telling the stories of “the Wandering Jews” as they journeyed from country to country.

The exhilarating story of a people’s survival exiled from their homeland by the Romans and their survival as a group in the Diaspora in spite of constant expulsion.

Poland

Before the outbreak of World War II, more than 3.3 million Jews lived in Poland, the largest Jewish population of Europe and second largest Jewish community in the world. Poland served as the center for Jewish culture and a diverse population of Jews from all over Europe sought refuge there, contributing to a wide variety of religious and cultural groups. Barely 11% of Poland’s Jews – 369,000 people – survived the war.

Series of two lectures:

Ottoman – June 15
Poland – June 22

 

 

Growth and Flourishing of Jewry and the Expulsion – Cont’d

Trudy Gold continues telling the stories of “the Wandering Jews” as they journeyed from country to country.

The exhilarating story of a people’s survival exiled from their homeland by the Romans and their survival as a group in the Diaspora in spite of constant expulsion.

Ottoman Empire

During the Classical Ottoman period, the Jews, together with most other communities of the empire, enjoyed a certain level of prosperity. Compared with other Ottoman subjects, they were the predominant power in commerce and trade as well as diplomacy and other high offices.

Series of two lectures:

June 15 – Ottoman Empire
June 22 – Poland

 

Growth and Flourishing of Jewry and the Expulsion

A new series with Trudy Gold telling the stories of “the Wandering Jews” as they journeyed from country to country.

The exhilarating story of a people’s survival exiled from their homeland by the Romans and their survival as a group in the Diaspora in spite of constant expulsion.

England

There were individual Jews living in England in Roman and Anglo-Saxon times (80-1066 A.D.), but not an organized community. When William the Conqueror arrived in England in 1066, he encouraged Jewish merchants and artisans from northern France to move to England. The Jews came mostly from France with some from Germany, Italy and Spain, seeking prosperity and a haven from anti-Semitism.

Series of 3 lectures:

Spain – May 11
Holland – May 18
England – May 25

 

Growth and Flourishing of Jewry and the Expulsion

A new series with Trudy Gold telling the stories of “the Wandering Jews” as they journeyed from country to country.

The exhilarating story of a people’s survival exiled from their homeland by the Romans and their survival as a group in the Diaspora in spite of constant expulsion.

Holland

There has been a consistent and vibrant Jewish presence in the Netherlands since Jews settled there after being expulsed from Spain and Portugal at the end of the 15th century. Tragically, this community was decimated during the Holocaust. Between the Spanish exile and the Holocaust, however, Dutch Jews contributed to one of the most prosperous and enlightened eras in the history of the Netherlands and Europe, producing such figures as the notable 17th century philosopher Baruch Spinoza, whose work continues to exert an effect on ethics, politics and philosophy well into the 21st century.

Series of three lectures:

May 11 – Spain
May 18- Holland
May 25 – England

 

Growth and Flourishing of Jewry and the Expulsion

A new series with Trudy Gold telling the stories of “the Wandering Jews” as they journeyed from country to country.

The exhilarating story of a people’s survival exiled from their homeland by the Romans and their survival as a group in the Diaspora in spite of constant expulsion.

SPAIN

In 1478, Ferdinand and Isabella had instituted the Inquisition, an effort by Spanish clergy to rid the country of heretics. Pogroms, individual acts of violence against Jews and anti-Semitic laws had been features of Catholic Spain for over a century before the Alhambra Order, causing deaths and conversions that greatly reduced Spain’s Jewish population.

The results of the Alhambra Order issued on March 31, 1492 were catastrophic. Jews were given until the end of July to leave the country, resulting in the hasty selling of much of their land and possessions to Catholics at artificially low prices. Estimation is difficult, but modern historians now believe around 40,000 Jews emigrated, with older estimates putting the number at several hundred thousand.

Series of three lectures:

May 11 – Spain
May 18- Holland
May 25 – England